A Visual and Interactive Guide to the Basics of Neural Networks

Motivation

I’m not a machine learning expert. I’m a software engineer by training and I’ve had little interaction with AI. I had always wanted to delve deeper into machine learning, but never really found my “in”. That’s why when Google open sourced TensorFlow in November 2015, I got super excited and knew it was time to jump in and start the learning journey. Not to sound dramatic, but to me, it actually felt kind of like Prometheus handing down fire to mankind from the Mount Olympus of machine learning. In the back of my head was the idea that the entire field of Big Data and technologies like Hadoop were vastly accelerated when Google researchers released their Map Reduce paper. This time it’s not a paper – it’s the actual software they use internally after years and years of evolution.

So I started learning what I can about the basics of the topic, and saw the need for gentler resources for people with no experience in the field. This is my attempt at that.

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Supercharging Android Apps With TensorFlow (Google's Open Source Machine Learning Library)

google-tensorflow-android.jpg

In November 2015, Google announced and open sourced TensorFlow, its latest and greatest machine learning library. This is a big deal for three reasons:

  1. Machine Learning expertise: Google is a dominant force in machine learning. Its prominence in search owes a lot to the strides it achieved in machine learning.
  2. Scalability: the announcement noted that TensorFlow was initially designed for internal use and that it’s already in production for some live product features.
  3. Ability to run on Mobile.

This last reason is the operating reason for this post since we’ll be focusing on Android. If you examine the tensorflow repo on GitHub, you’ll find a little tensorflow/examples/android directory. I’ll try to shed some light on the Android TensorFlow example and some of the things going on under the hood.

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